Imagine Ancient Rome. Think armor, the colosseum, marble surrounding you on all sides.

Now imagine Ancient Roman aqueducts. See the repeating arches perfect in their symmetry, spanning across the channel and overflowing with water.

Ancient Romans had it right years ago with their complex aqueduct system. They built these structures by relying on molds for consistency and quality. Sound familiar?

Precast concrete has a history of being the choice for beauty, longevity and ease of use.

John Alexander Brodie, England native, invented the precast concrete system in 1906. Even though his system didn’t take off in Britain right away, many others across the world were impressed with how quickly he could build houses using his pre-fabricated housing technology.

Many in the industry still value precast concrete for its time and money saving qualities. Because required maintenance is limited, precast concrete is an ongoing favorite for U.S. manufacturers. Without Brodie tapping into the Roman’s earlier approach of replicating structures, we may not be where we are today in terms of speed, durability and installation.

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Currently, manufacturers use precast, especially when prestressed, concrete for office buildings, bridges and parking garages. The future for precast is bright. We expect manufacturers and the general public to learn more about how versatile, healthy, durable, ecological and cost-effective precast concrete is and begin to use this time-efficient method of creating lasting structures more.

Ready to get started?

If your plant isn’t optimized for manufacturing precast concrete and you’re interested in learning where to begin, Standley Batch Systems can provide custom solutions to fit your current operations. Contact us at sales@standleybatch.com or call (800) 425-8084 to learn more.

 

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