Exposing Commercial and Residential Concrete Project Differences

If you're interested in breaking into the residential or commercial industries for your concrete products, you should be aware of the pretty large differences between the industries. Commercial concrete covers a large range of potential projects, including paving, polishing, parking lots and full-on construction. Commercial projects usually require stronger concrete mixes over residential due to … Continue reading Exposing Commercial and Residential Concrete Project Differences

How Your Plant Can Measure Up to Your Projects

At Standley Batch Systems, Inc. we work with the best materials available to ensure your plant functions to the highest degree. The material of our choice for our plants is Epoxy-Coated Rebar. Fast facts: Epoxy-coated rebar is used in more than 65,000 bridges across the U.S. Epoxy coating is the second most powerful prevention for … Continue reading How Your Plant Can Measure Up to Your Projects

Are You Monitoring the Most Potentially Destructive Ingredient in Your Aggregate?

As a concrete manufacturer, you should be well familiar with Abram's law: a mixture's water to cement ratio determines the concrete's strength. In other words, excess water means weaker concrete.  Serious concrete producers use precise tools for measuring their aggregate contents. And if you're not measuring moisture condition, you could be compromising your entire batch. … Continue reading Are You Monitoring the Most Potentially Destructive Ingredient in Your Aggregate?

The Controversial Pipe Materials Debate: Concrete versus Plastic

Reinforced concrete pipe (RCP) continues to provide drainage solutions for projects all across the world, but some are beginning to wonder if the alternative, corrugated high-density polyethylene pipe (HDPE), is the better investment. On the surface, plastic pipes seem more affordable than precast pipes. However, as is the case with most products available at a … Continue reading The Controversial Pipe Materials Debate: Concrete versus Plastic